COVID-19 Working Capital Access Guidelines

COVID-19 Working Capital Access Guidelines

The COVID-19 Working Capital Access (CWCA) Program is administered by the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority (PIDA) and provides critical working capital financing to small businesses located within the Commonwealth that are adversely impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak.
All CWCA loan applications must be submitted through a Certified Economic Development Organization (CEDO). For the list of CEDO’s operating within Pennsylvania, please refer to www.dced.pa.gov/CWCA.

The guidlelines can be downloaded below.

COVID-19 Working Capital Access Guidelines

Chambersburg Borough Takes Additional Action During COVID-19 Crisis

Chambersburg Borough Takes Additional Action During COVID-19 Crisis

Organized by the Borough of Chambersburg, as of Tuesday, March 24, ten Chambersburg Area Churches have stepped forward to offer food supplies to any families that might become homebound because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The Borough has had a Pandemic Response plan in place for about 10 years now,” said Assistant Borough Manager David Finch, who acts as Emergency Management Coordinator during local emergencies. “One very important aspect of the plan was to prepare for citizens who become too sick to feed themselves or care for their families. We will coordinate with local churches to provide the food they might need.”

Requests for aid may be routed to Mr. Finch, at (717) 660-2702. In other planning, the Borough is releasing a mailing to all 11,000 utility customers explaining their options for contacting the Borough during the health emergency. Chambersburg prohibited access to municipal buildings and facilities effective Monday, March 23, 2020.

According to Borough Manager Jeffrey Stonehill, “for convenience and safety, we encourage the use of alternative methods of payment and communication to avoid physical in-person utility transactions whenever possible. If you must make a payment by cash or check, please use the U.S. Mail (please do not mail cash), or use the Borough’s secure drop-box located to the right of the rear lobby entrance. If you would like a receipt, please include a note with your payment and one will be mailed to you. Billing communication, questions, or discussion is best via phone at (717) 264-5151, or by email at customerservicegroup@chambersburgpa.gov , which is for billing inquiries.” Stonehill added that he anticipates delays as customers attempt to use the single Drive-Thru Teller Window at City Hall.

In an attempt to encourage social distancing, the Borough will suspend house-to-house meter reading on a temporary basis. As a result, utility bills sent in April 2020 will be “estimated” based on an account’s historic usage. A reconciliation of “estimated” to “actual” usage will happen at the end of the crisis; or, when a customer closes out their utility account. This will lessen the need for Borough employees to read meters.

On Monday, March 23, Chambersburg installed digital information signs at the entrances to the town. According to Stonehill, the Borough added the signs so that “we have another means to disseminate public information. At this time, we still are unsure whether Governor Wolf will order stricter restrictions. We want to keep in touch with citizens and businesses and provide them with good information. The digital signs are another way to communicate.”

Finally, Deputy Borough Manager Phil Wolgemuth is coordinating with food service retailers on enforcement of the restriction on eat-in dining establishments. According to Mr. Wolgemuth, “most licensees have been very cooperative, adjusting their business practices, and complying with the directions issued by the Governor. We know that these are challenging times for our community’s small businesses, and we want to thank Sam Thrush and Downtown Chambersburg, Inc., for getting information out there as to how to support our local businesses.” The Downtown Chambersburg, Inc., website is www.downtownchambersburgpa.com . “Chambersburg is proud to protect the health and safety of our residents and businesses,” added Borough Manager Jeffrey Stonehill. “When Town Council gathers next, they will discuss our temporary actions to address this crisis and whether more actions are available for their approval. We stand by to support our residents and businesses during this difficult time.”

The “Peerless” Past of Franklin County’s Steam Power

The “Peerless” Past of Franklin County’s Steam Power

In the 1880s, Waynesboro was known for two steam engines, the Geiser Manufacturing Company’s “Peerless” steam engine and Frick Company’s “Eclipse.” To broaden their product line, Geiser later developed a steam-powered “Peerless” gang lplow to go along with the “New Peerless” thressing machines, hay presses, and sawmills that were already in the line.

This is an amazing part of the building of Franklin County and the contributions it made to early America.

The following is an excerpt from Geiser: A Waynesboro Industrial Icon’s History and Legacy puts the genius of Peter Geiser in perspective.

“In 1858, Peter (geiser) arranged with Georgbe Frick, operator of a small foundry and machine shop to build Geiser separators at his shop on his father’s farm in Ringgold Maryland. This would prove to be a long and successful association. Frick was an inventor and mechanical genius who was also destined to play a large, important part in the development of industrial Waynesboro. An agreement also was reached with Samuel Fitz to build threshers at his Hanover, Pennsylvania and Martinsburg, West Virginia shops. As business continued to expand, Daniel joined Peter to grow the trade.

During the following year, Frick built 20 machines in the Rigngold shop, and the four small shops involved in building Geiser equipment turned out a total of 111 units.”

Steam power grew America’s agricultural capacity.

Find out more about Waynesboro’s industrial history from the Waynesboro Industrial Museum by clicking here.

Meet Flat Ben

Meet Flat Ben

Franklin County is named for Ben Franklin. Flat Ben is the ultimate ambassador of Franklin County. He is Franklin County’s version of Flat Stanley. Click here to print Ben. Color him and cut him out. Then, make him a part of what you are doing. Snap a picture of what you and Flat Ben are doing…planting seeds, cooking, singing, or just being silly. Send your shots of you and Flat Ben to lformosa@explorefranklincountypa.com. Be sure to tell us a quick description of what you and Flat Ben are doing and include your first name and last initial or the initials of your first, middle, and last name. We will post these on Fun in Franklin County on ExploreFranklinCountyPA.com and Facebook.com/FCVBen.

Flat Ben 

Where is this?

Where is this?

This is an image of Franklin County. Where was it taken? What year do you think it is? What are the clues? Please send responses to jpollard@explorefranklincountypa.com.