The Institute Holds First Solistice Celebration

The Institute Holds First Solistice Celebration

The Institute is hosting their first-ever Winter Solstice Celebration on Sunday, Dec. 20 from 2 to 6 p.m. at Red Run Park in Rouzerville, Pa. The winter solstice is the longest night—or the shortest day—of the year, and falls on December 21 this year in the Northern Hemisphere.Since ancient times, people all over the world have recognized this important astronomical occurrence and celebrated the “return of the sun” in a variety of ways. After the solstice, the days get gradually longer.

The Institute’s solstice event is a family-friendly celebration of the season with entertainment and activities. Storyteller Bruce Rowland will tell winter folktales at 3:00 and 4:30 p.m. Activities for children include free grab-and-go kits to create edible outdoor garlands for animals, and others with materials to construct a paper lantern. These projects can be taken home, or created on site during the event. Fire pit stations and hot chocolate will provide warmth.

Members of the Tri-State Astronomers club will be on hand with telescopes to safely observe the solstice sun. After sunset, there will be opportunities to view the celestial features of the winter sky. Vendors include Artesano Bake Goods, offering cookies, holiday snack mix and whoopie pies for purchase, Four Sons Farm with handcrafted wool creations, and The Native Niche, featuring bird food bundles, outdoor winter decorations, and natural “solstice crowns” of winter foliage for sale.

The event is free but pre-registration is required. Attendance is limited. COVID-19 safety protocols will be followed and signed safety waivers are required for registration. To protect everyone, face masks are required for this event. Register via email at info@instituteatrenfrew.org. The entire event is outdoors, so attendees should dress accordingly.

This event is supported by lead sponsor, Steel Warehouse, and by The Institute’s Today’s Horizon Fund contributors: The Nora Roberts Foundation; The John R. Hershey Jr. and Anna L. Hershey Family Foundation; APX Enclosures, Inc.; and the Carolyn Terry Eddy Family: Carolyn, with daughters Connie Fleagle & Kim Larkin. Facility support courtesy of Washington Township.

Allison-Antrim Museum Offers Virtual November Speaker From Archives

Allison-Antrim Museum Offers Virtual November Speaker From Archives

Allison-Antrim Museum’s “virtual” November speaker is local historian, Tim Rockwell, Mercersburg, introduced by the late Ted Alexander.

Rockwell spoke 16 years ago in April 2004 about Sgt. Patrick Gass’ Franklin County roots and his important role in the Lewis and Clark Expedition.  2004 marked the middle of the 200th Anniversary Commemoration of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1803 – 1806. Patrick Gass’ home in Chambersburg is part of the Franklin Farms complex.

While Lewis and Clark and their legendary Indian guide, Sacajawea, are well known, many have never heard of Gass. As chief carpenter for the expedition, Gass built the winter quarters, wagons, and dugout canoes, among many other accomplishments while on the trek.

Rockwell is the former Dean of Students at the Mercersburg Academy and is an historical archeologist who has done work for The Smithsonian Institution, The National Park Service, and The National Trust for Historic Preservation.

To watch Tim Rockwell’s presentation, visit: https://greencastlemuseum.org/videos

Allison-Antrim Museum, 365 South Ridge Avenue, Greencastle, PA 17225 is open “by appointment,” by calling 717-597-9010, Tuesday to Friday, noon to 4 pm and Saturday 11 am to 1 pm.  Masks are required. For more information, please visit: www.greencastlemuseum.org, daily on Facebook, or on Twitter @greencastlemuzm.