Pumpkins & Pippins’ Fall Festival Set for October 16 at Pine Hill Recreation Area

Pumpkins & Pippins’ Fall Festival Set for October 16 at Pine Hill Recreation Area

The Institute is Celebrating fall at Pine Hill Recreation Area, on Mentzer Gap Road in Waynesboro, with family fun at Pumpkins & Pippins!

Enjoy live music by Mountain Air, performing a mix of acoustic contemporary folk and pop music. Have lunch from Coco’s Grill or Maddie Ann’s Perogies food trucks, with dessert from our bake sale. Activities include Kid Zone/Yard Games, Pony Rides, StoryWalk® Hike &Activity, and Apple Cider Press Demonstrations.

In addition, visit our craft vendors, and watch the star attraction—the Trebuchet Pumpkin Launcher!

Other fun stuff includes Pie Walk, Pumpkin Patch, Vote for Your Favorite Decorated Pumpkin, and a Raffle (bring some cash!).

YOU CAN enter your decorated pumpkin—carved OR painted—in our Decorated Pumpkin Contest and could win $100! Details here. Or see info at the end of the post. This event is a fundraiser for The Institute, a non-profit organization, stewarding the natural and cultural resources of the Cumberland Valley for more than 30 years.

The Institute Offers “Bloomin’ Walks”

The Institute Offers “Bloomin’ Walks”

The Institute is offering two early summer “Bloomin’ Walks” to view blossoming mountain laurel and rhododendron. The walks are on Saturdays, June 12 and 26 from 10 a.m. to noon.

Part of The Institute’s Naturalist Discovery Series, the walks are led by Institute naturalist, Dr. Doris Goldman. Hikers will explore trails in Michaux Forest and in Happel’s Meadow. 

On June 12, we’ll mark National Get Outside Day with a hike along the Appalachian Trail in Michaux Forest,” said Goldman. “We will see blooming mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia), which is the state flower of Pennsylvania. 

The blossoms look like folded origami flowers.”

The June 26 hike, Celebrate the Summer Solstice, is on the John Birely Memorial Trail at Happel’s Meadow, where blooming rosebay or great rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum) can be found. The clusters of flowers are a hummingbird favorite. 

“This walk is quite shady and mossy, and always cooler than in the valley or most of the drier areas in the mountains,” Goldman said. 

The walks are free, but pre-registration is required. Register via email at info@natureandcultureinstitute.org. Rendezvous point for the hike and more details will be sent upon registration.

COVID-19 safety protocols will be followed, and signed waivers are required for registration.

This program is sponsored by The Institute’s Today’s Horizon Fund Contributors: The Nora Roberts Foundation; The John R. Hershey Jr. and Anna L. Hershey Family Foundation; APX Enclosures, Inc.; The Carolyn Terry Eddy Family: Carolyn, with daughters Connie Fleagle & Kim Larkin.

More information is available at www.natureandcultureinstitute.org.

A new book has been installed on the StoryWalk® children’s story trail at Pine Hill Recreation Area off Mentzer Gap Road in Waynesboro. The park is open during daylight hours, and visiting the StoryWalk® is free. 

Compost Stew by Mary McKenna Siddals, with illustrations by Ashley Wolff, was installed by The Institute, in partnership with Washington Township, Alexander Hamilton Memorial Free Library and the Waynesboro Area School District (WASD).

 “The weather is warming up, and we hope people will come out and enjoy this family-friendly activity, reading an adventure as they walk along the trail,” said Pam Rowland, an education director for The Institute.

 The StoryWalk® trail is at the top of the park (just past the Dunlap Family Skate Park), and is easily accessible and wheelchair friendly.

 The trail is open year-round, and plans call for a new book to be installed every month or two. Compost Stew will remain up through April.

 Participants should practice social distancing, giving others six feet of space, and follow official Covid-19 safety guidelines while in the park.

 The StoryWalk®  is sponsored by Kathy Helfrick and Jane Glenn, with additional support from The Institute’s Today’s Horizon Fund contributors: The Nora Roberts Foundation; The John R. Hershey Jr. and Anna L. Hershey Family Foundation; APX Enclosures, Inc.; and the Carolyn Terry Eddy Family: Carolyn, with daughters Connie Fleagle & Kim Larkin. Facility support courtesy of Washington Township.

 The StoryWalk® Project was created by Anne Ferguson of Montpelier, VT and developed in collaboration with the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. StoryWalk® is a registered service mark owned by Ms. Ferguson.

The Institute Offers Job Postings

The Institute Offers Job Postings

The Institute, located in Waynesboro PA, is searching for three environmental educators—Early Childhood Environmental Educator, Environmental Educator, Environmental Educator/Watershed Science Coordinator. The positions have different areas of focus.

The Early Childhood Environmental Educator is responsible for delivering established programs of TheInstitute at the preschool– 4th grade levels and developing creative new programs into the future. The primary role of this position is to work outdoors with preschool and primary age groups. Download the full job description here.

The Environmental Educator is responsible for delivering established programs of The Institute at the K–12 grade levels and developing creative new programs into the future. The primary role of this position is to work outdoors with school groups and the general public. Download the full job description here.

The Environmental Educator/Watershed Science Coordinator is responsible for delivering established programs of The Institute at the K– 12 grade levels and developing creative new programs into the future. As watershed science coordinator, the educator will also work with The Institute’s WaterStriders students, college interns and local watershed organizations. Download the full job description here.

The early childhood educator must work in cooperation with co-teachers, administrators, volunteers, interns, and all other personnel of The Institute. The Institute is an equal opportunity employer. The Institute celebrates diversity and are committed to creating an inclusive environment for all employees.

Foodies Love Franklin Fresh Food & Dining Guide

Foodies Love Franklin Fresh Food & Dining Guide

Franklin County Visitors Bureau showcases fresh food and great dining in the Franklin Fresh Food & Dining Guide. The county has an abundance of freshness to share. It ranks second in vegetable production in the state, is home to the Chambersburg peach, and yields 850 million pounds of milk annually. With such a variety of fresh foods, foodies love Franklin County.

For 2020-21, the “Sweet Trail” is back with more stops—including delicious ice cream, chocolate and candy stops across the county. It even throws in a few favorite recipes and tips on growing fresh food. Franklin Fresh Food & Dining Guide also features all-American and international flavors of Franklin County; a spotlight on local breweries, wineries, and distilleries; listings of farm stands, farmers markets, and honey producers plus a guide to local restaurants. Franklin County’s agricultural past is showcased in Stitches in Time Barn Quilt Trail; trail map is included on the inside back cover.

The publication is a great way to plan a “foodie tour” of Franklin County and take home some of the fresh foods from farmers markets, cheese makers, and creameries to enjoy a little longer. It even throws in a few favorite recipes. Plan a visit today; check out the publication online here. Or, contact the Franklin County Visitors Bureau at 866.646.8060 to receive a printed publication.